Edmund Husserl’s Theory of Phenomenology

Edmund Husserl pic
Edmund Husserl
Image: alchetron.com

Sparta, NJ, resident Michael Perry serves as the head of marketing for ClubsGalore, a popular provider of gift-of-the-month style clubs. In his free time, Michael Perry enjoys reading and studying philosophy and is particularly fond of the works of Cicero and Edmund Husserl.

Widely considered to be the leading creator of phenomenology, though he was not the first to use that term, Edmund Husserl’s work in the area began as a criticism of naturalism and psychologism. Naturalism is the idea that everything we observe is part of nature and, therefore, governed by the laws of nature and subject to evaluation by empirical data and hard science. Psychologism deals with the connections between the laws of psychology and the laws of logic, philosophy, and how humans come to understand the world around them.

Husserl maintained that the study of consciousness is separate from the study of the natural world. Rather than evaluating vast quantities of data, as in the hard sciences, his theory of phenomenology relies on specific examples of human experiences from a first-person perspective. Simply put, his ideas focus on the idea that the boundaries of human consciousness and human understanding shape the way humans experience and define the objects and events around them.

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